Idioms The Idiom Connection





Leg and Foot Idioms










Leg and Foot Idioms

Achilles' heel (of someone or something)

- the weak part of a person/place/system/argument which can easily be attacked or criticized

The lack of a new stadium was the Achilles' heel of the government's plans to host the Olympics.

at (someone`s) heels

- close behind someone

The large car was at my heels while I was driving through the park.

back on one`s feet

- to recover from sickness or trouble, to become independent again

Our teacher was back on her feet shortly after her accident.
The man recently lost his job but he is now back on his feet.

balls of one's feet

- the bottom of the feet behind the toes

The balls of my feet were very sore after walking all day.

bound hand and foot

- to have one's hands and feet tied up

The bank manager was bound hand and foot by the bank robbers.

Break a leg!

- Good luck! (an expression that is used in theater performances)

"Break a leg!" the director called to the lead actor.

bring (someone) to heel

- to make someone obey you or pay attention to you again after he or she has stopped obeying or paying attention to you

The new supervisor quickly brought the employees to heel.

bring (someone or something) to its/their knees

- to have a negative effect on someone or something, to destroy someone or a group of people, to defeat someone or something

The strike by the teachers quickly brought the school district to its knees.

charley horse

- a cramp in one's arm or leg from straining oneself or doing too much exercise

I got a charley horse while I was running this morning.

cool one`s heels

- to be forced to wait by someone in power or authority

I was forced to cool my heels in the lobby while I waited for the job interview.

cost an arm and a leg or cost (someone) an arm and a leg

- to cost much money

My father's car cost him an arm and a leg.

dead on one's feet

- very tired, worn out

I was dead on my feet when I returned from shopping all day.

dig in one's heels

- to refuse to change one's mind or one's course of action

The man decided to dig in his heels and would not accept the offer to settle the dispute.

dip one's toe in the water

- to slowly start to do something new in order to see if you like it or if other people will approve of it

I am doing some volunteer work at the hospital in order to dip my toe in the water and see if I like the medical field.

down-at-the-heels

- poorly dressed, looking poor

A man who looked down-at-the-heels came to the small cafe for dinner.

drag one`s feet

- to act slowly or reluctantly

Our company is dragging their feet about making a decision to hire new workers.

drag one`s heels

- to act slowly or reluctantly

My friend is dragging his heels about whether or not he should accept the new job.

fall head over heels

- to fall down (and maybe roll over)

The little boy fell head over heels when he was running in the park.

fall head over heels in love (with someone)

- to fall deeply in love with someone

The young man fell head over heels in love with the girl in his English class.

feet of clay

- a hidden or unexpected fault or weakness that a respected or powerful person has

The new manager has feet of clay and may not last very long in his new position.

find one's feet

- to become accustomed to a new situation or experience

I was able to easily find my feet when I started my new job.

follow in (someone's) footsteps

- to do what someone else has done (often to do the same job as one's father or mother)

The young man followed in his father's footsteps and decided to become an accountant.

footloose and fancy-free

- able to do whatever you want without any obligations

The couple have no children and they are footloose and fancy-free.

from head to toe

- from the top of one's head to one's feet

I dressed warmly from head to toe before I went outside.

get a foothold (somewhere)

- to find a starting point somewhere, to get a firm basis where further progress or development is possible

The small company was able to get a foothold in the breakfast cereal market.

get a toehold (somewhere)

- to find a starting point somewhere, to get a firm basis where further progress or development is possible

Our company was finally able to get a toehold in the textbook market.

get cold feet

- to become afraid and hesitant about something at the last minute

I wanted to go to Europe with my cousin but he got cold feet and decided not to go.

get off on the wrong foot with (someone)

- to make a bad start to a relationship

Unfortunately, my relationship with my new teacher got off on the wrong foot.

get one`s feet wet

- to do something for the first time, to gain your first experience of something

The writer got his feet wet in the publishing business and he is now ready to start his own business.

get one's foot in the door

- to begin to do something that you hope will lead to future success (often used with jobs or careers)

I was able to get my foot in the door of the banking industry when I found a job at a bank.

get one's sea legs

- to become accustomed to something, to become accustomed to a ship moving at sea

After a few days at my new job, I was able to get my sea legs.
After we got our sea legs, we were able to walk around the boat.

get to one's feet

- to stand up

The audience got to their feet at the end of the concert.

go down on bended knee

- to show a lot of emotion when you are asking someone for something, to act like a servant

The man had to go down on bended knee to ask for the job.

go down on one's knees

- to show a lot of emotion when you are asking someone for something, to act like a servant

I was forced to go down on my knees and ask my supervisor for a holiday.

go toe-to-toe (with someone)

- to be in close and direct confrontation or competition with someone, to be in close combat with someone

The two men went toe-to-toe in their debate.
The wrestlers went toe-to-toe for the championship.

hard on (someone's) heels

- to be following someone very closely

The dog was hard on the young boy's heels.

have a foot in both camps

- to support each of two opposing groups of people, to have an interest in two opposing groups of people

The new mayor has a foot in both camps of the development dispute.

have a hollow leg

- to be able to eat or drink a lot

I think that my friend has a hollow leg. He never stops eating.

have a lead foot

- to drive too fast

My friend has a lead foot and he has received many speeding tickets.

(not) have a leg to stand on

- to have no support or excuse or evidence for something

The criminal does not have a leg to stand on in his defense.

have a leg up on (someone)

- to have an advantage in your job or education because someone gives you help or money

The boy went to summer school which should give him a leg up on the other students in his class.

have cold feet

- to be afraid and hesitant about something at the last minute

I think that my friend has cold feet and will not go traveling with me.

have foot-in-mouth disease

- to embarrass oneself by a silly mistake or by saying something stupid

I think that my friend has foot-in-mouth disease. She is always making stupid statements.

have legs

- (an idea or plan or topic) is likely to succeed or to continue

The news story has legs. People will be talking about it for a long time.

have one foot in the grave

- to be near death

Our neighbor has one foot in the grave and I do not expect him to live much longer.

have one's feet (planted firmly) on the ground

- to have sensible ideas, to have an understanding of what can be done in a certain situation

The new manager seems to have his feet on the ground and should have a sensible solution to our problems.
The man has his feet planted firmly on the ground and is very sensible.

have two left feet

- to move in a very awkward way when you dance

The man has two left feet and he is a very bad dancer.

keep on one's toes

- to stay alert and watchful

The students were forced to keep on their toes by their new teacher.

keep one's feet (firmly) on the ground

- to remain firmly established

The man is trying hard to keep his feet firmly on the ground with his new job and new apartment.
The man is trying to keep his feet on the ground now that he has a family.

kick up one`s heels

- to have a good time, to celebrate

We kicked up our heels and had a good time at the party.

knee-high to a grasshopper

- not very tall (usually used for a child)

My grandfather told me many stories when I was knee-high to a grasshopper.

knock (someone) off his or her feet

- to surprise or shock someone so much that he or she does not know what to do, to overwhelm someone

The singer's voice was so beautiful that it knocked me off my feet.

land on one's feet

- to come out of a bad situation successfully

The man was able to land on his feet soon after he lost his job.

(not) let the grass grow under one`s feet

- to be idle, to be lazy, to waste time

My friend is never content to let the grass grow under his feet. He is always busy.

light on one's feet

- to be able to move quickly and gracefully

The boxer is light on his feet and he wins many boxing matches.

make one's toes curl

- to make one feel uncomfortable

The story about the horrible accident made my toes curl.

My foot!

- not possible, no way (used to say that you do not believe something)

"The secretary is absent from work because she is sick."
"Sick, my foot! She is probably just lazy and wants a holiday."

on bended knee

- with great humility

I went to my neighbor on bended knee to ask him if I could borrow some money.

on foot

- by walking

We decided to go to the stadium on foot.

on one's feet

- standing up

I was on my feet for several hours yesterday. Today, I am very tired.

on (someone`s) heels

- close behind someone, following someone

The dog was on the heels of the small rabbit.
I was right on my friend's heels as we hurried to the stadium.

on one`s toes

- alert, ready to act

The speaker kept the audience members on their toes by asking many interesting questions.

on (something's) last legs

- something is almost worn out or finished

My television is on its last legs and I will soon have to buy a new one.

on the heels of (something)

- soon after something

There was a big rain storm on the heels of the recent wind storm.

on tiptoe

- standing or walking on the front part of one's feet

I stood on tiptoe in order to look into the construction site.

pay an arm and a leg (for something)

- to pay a lot of money for something

The woman paid an arm and a leg for her new coat.

play footsie (with someone)

- to attract someone's attention by touching his or her foot under a table, to flirt with someone

The couple at the restaurant were playing footsie with each other.

pull (someone`s) leg

- to fool someone, to trick someone, to joke with someone

My friend was pulling my leg when he said that he had won much money.

put one's best foot forward

- to try and make a good impression on other people, to act one's best

I tried to put my best foot forward during the job interview.

put one's foot down (about something)

- to object to something strongly, to refuse to do something, to refuse to allow something to happen

The woman put her foot down and stopped paying for the gas for her daughter's car.

put one's foot in one's mouth

- to say something that is the wrong thing to say in a situation

I put my foot in my mouth and said that I did not like fish just before my friend served me fish for dinner.

put one's toe in the water

- to slowly start to do something new to see if you like it or to see if other people will approve of it

I plan to put my toe in the water to see if the new job is suitable for me.

regain one's feet

- to stand up again after falling or almost falling, to become independent after financial difficulties

I quickly regained my feet after almost falling on the sidewalk.
The man has finally regained his feet after losing his job.

set foot (somewhere)

- to go or enter somewhere

The restaurant owner has not set foot in his restaurant for several months.

set one back on one's heels

- to surprise or shock or overwhelm someone

The announcement on the school's loudspeaker set everybody back on their heels.

shake a leg

- to go fast, to hurry

"Please try and shake a leg. We are already late for the concert."

the shoe is on the other foot

- the opposite is true, someone's place or situation is changed into someone else's place or situation

My friend always has problems at school but now the shoe is on the other foot and I am the one who is having problems.

shoot oneself in the foot

- to make a mistake or a stupid decision that makes a situation worse

The man shot himself in the foot when he refused to work extra to help his boss with the new project.

sit at (someone's) feet

- to admire someone greatly, to be taught by someone

I would love to sit at the feet of the famous painter.

six feet under

- dead (buried six feet under the ground in a grave)

The criminal is a bad person and if he does not change, he will soon be six feet under.

stand on one's own two feet

- to be independent and self-sufficient

The woman should do something to make her daughter stand on her own two feet.

start off on the wrong foot with (someone or something)

- to make a bad start to a relationship with a person or organization

I started off on the wrong foot with my boss and now we do not have a good relationship.
The man started off on the wrong foot with his company and he has many problems now.

step on (someone`s) toes

- to do something that interferes with or offends someone else

The man is careful that he does not step on anybody's toes at his company.

stretch one's legs

- to walk around after sitting or lying down for a period of time

The airplane passenger decided to stand up and stretch her legs.

sweep (someone) off his or her feet

- to overwhelm someone (with love etc.), to knock someone down

The woman was swept off her feet when she met the young man at the party.
The large wave swept the man off his feet at the seashore.

one's tail is between one`s legs

- one has a feeling of being beaten or humiliated (like a frightened dog as it walks away)

The salesman was forced to leave the company with his tail between his legs after he told a lie about his sales figures.

take a load off one's feet

- to sit down and relax

I sat down in order to take a load off my feet.

take to one's heels

- to run away

The little boys took to their heels when the older boys approached.

think on one's feet

- to think or reason or plan while one is talking or doing something (usually this is done under pressure)

I had to think on my feet when the flood waters began to approach my house.

throw oneself at (someone's) feet

- to behave in a very humble manner

The man threw himself at his friend's feet and asked for forgiveness for the problems that he had caused.

toe the line/mark

- to follow the rules, to do what one is expected to do

The team members were forced to toe the line when the new coach arrived.

tread on (someone`s) toes

- to do something that interferes with or offends someone else

I do not want to tread on my supervisor's toes because he is not in a good mood today.

turn on one`s heel

- to turn around suddenly

The dog suddenly turned on his heel and ran away.

under (someone's) feet

- to annoy or interrupt someone when he or she is working

The children were under their mother's feet while she was cooking dinner.

vote with one's feet

- to express one's dissatisfaction with something by leaving or walking away

The students were voting with their feet when they began to leave the science course.

wait on (someone) hand and foot

- to serve someone in every possible way, to do everything for someone

I always wait on my friend hand and foot when she comes to visit me.

with one's tail between one's legs

- feeling beaten or humiliated (like a frightened or defeated dog as it walks away)

The saleswoman left the sales meeting with her tail between her legs because she did not meet the sales target.

Feet Idioms


back on one`s feet

- to recover from sickness or trouble, to become independent again

Our teacher was back on her feet shortly after her accident.
The man recently lost his job but he is now back on his feet.

balls of one's feet

- the bottom of the feet behind the toes

The balls of my feet were very sore after walking all day.

bound hand and foot

- to have one's hands and feet tied up

The bank manager was bound hand and foot by the bank robbers.

dead on one's feet

- very tired, worn out

I was dead on my feet when I returned from shopping all day.

drag one`s feet

- to act slowly or reluctantly

Our company is dragging their feet about making a decision to hire new workers.

feet of clay

- a hidden or unexpected fault or weakness that a respected or powerful person has

The new manager has feet of clay and may not last very long in his new position.

find one's feet

- to become accustomed to a new situation or experience

I was able to easily find my feet when I started my new job.

follow in (someone's) footsteps

- to do what someone else has done (often to do the same job as one's father or mother)

The young man followed in his father's footsteps and decided to become an accountant.

footloose and fancy-free

- able to do whatever you want without any obligations

The couple have no children and they are footloose and fancy-free.

get a foothold (somewhere)

- to find a starting point somewhere, to get a firm basis where further progress or development is possible

The small company was able to get a foothold in the breakfast cereal market.

get cold feet

- to become afraid and hesitant about something at the last minute

I wanted to go to Europe with my cousin but he got cold feet and decided not to go.

get off on the wrong foot with (someone)

- to make a bad start to a relationship

Unfortunately, my relationship with my new teacher got off on the wrong foot.

get one`s feet wet

- to do something for the first time, to gain your first experience of something

The writer got his feet wet in the publishing business and he is now ready to start his own business.

get one's foot in the door

- to begin to do something that you hope will lead to future success (often used with jobs or careers)

I was able to get my foot in the door of the banking industry when I found a job at a bank.

get to one's feet

- to stand up

The audience got to their feet at the end of the concert.

have a foot in both camps

- to support each of two opposing groups of people, to have an interest in two opposing groups of people

The new mayor has a foot in both camps of the development dispute.

have a lead foot

- to drive too fast

My friend has a lead foot and he has received many speeding tickets.

have cold feet

- to be afraid and hesitant about something at the last minute

I think that my friend has cold feet and will not go traveling with me.

have foot-in-mouth disease

- to embarrass oneself by a silly mistake or by saying something stupid

I think that my friend has foot-in-mouth disease. She is always making stupid statements.

have one foot in the grave

- to be near death

Our neighbor has one foot in the grave and I do not expect him to live much longer.

have one's feet (planted firmly) on the ground

- to have sensible ideas, to have an understanding of what can be done in a certain situation

The new manager seems to have his feet on the ground and should have a sensible solution to our problems.
The man has his feet planted firmly on the ground and is very sensible.

have two left feet

- to move in a very awkward way when you dance

The man has two left feet and he is a very bad dancer.

keep one's feet (firmly) on the ground

- to remain firmly established

The man is trying hard to keep his feet firmly on the ground with his new job and new apartment.
The man is trying to keep his feet on the ground now that he has a family.

knock (someone) off his or her feet

- to surprise or shock someone so much that he or she does not know what to do, to overwhelm someone

The singer's voice was so beautiful that it knocked me off my feet.

land on one's feet

- to come out of a bad situation successfully

The man was able to land on his feet soon after he lost his job.

(not) let the grass grow under one`s feet

- to be idle, to be lazy, to waste time

My friend is never content to let the grass grow under his feet. He is always busy.

light on one's feet

- to be able to move quickly and gracefully

The boxer is light on his feet and he wins many boxing matches.

My foot!

- not possible, no way (used to say that you do not believe something)

"The secretary is absent from work because she is sick."
"Sick, my foot! She is probably just lazy and wants a holiday."

on foot

- by walking

We decided to go to the stadium on foot.

on one's feet

- standing up

I was on my feet for several hours yesterday. Today, I am very tired.

play footsie (with someone)

- to attract someone's attention by touching his or her foot under a table, to flirt with someone

The couple at the restaurant were playing footsie with each other.

put one's best foot forward

- to try and make a good impression on other people, to act one's best

I tried to put my best foot forward during the job interview.

put one's foot down (about something)

- to object to something strongly, to refuse to do something, to refuse to allow something to happen

The woman put her foot down and stopped paying for the gas for her daughter's car.

put one's foot in one's mouth

- to say something that is the wrong thing to say in a situation

I put my foot in my mouth and said that I did not like fish just before my friend served me fish for dinner.

regain one's feet

- to stand up again after falling or almost falling, to become independent after financial difficulties

I quickly regained my feet after almost falling on the sidewalk.
The man has finally regained his feet after losing his job.

set foot (somewhere)

- to go or enter somewhere

The restaurant owner has not set foot in his restaurant for several months.

the shoe is on the other foot

- the opposite is true, someone's place or situation is changed into someone else's place or situation

My friend always has problems at school but now the shoe is on the other foot and I am the one who is having problems.

shoot oneself in the foot

- to make a mistake or a stupid decision that makes a situation worse

The man shot himself in the foot when he refused to work extra to help his boss with the new project.

sit at (someone's) feet

- to admire someone greatly, to be taught by someone

I would love to sit at the feet of the famous painter.

six feet under

- dead (buried six feet under the ground in a grave)

The criminal is a bad person and if he does not change, he will soon be six feet under.

stand on one's own two feet

- to be independent and self-sufficient

The woman should do something to make her daughter stand on her own two feet.

start off on the wrong foot with (someone or something)

- to make a bad start to a relationship with a person or organization

I started off on the wrong foot with my boss and now we do not have a good relationship.
The man started off on the wrong foot with his company and he has many problems now.

sweep (someone) off his or her feet

- to overwhelm someone (with love etc.), to knock someone down

The woman was swept off her feet when she met the young man at the party.
The large wave swept the man off his feet at the seashore.

take a load off one's feet

- to sit down and relax

I sat down in order to take a load off my feet.

think on one's feet

- to think or reason or plan while one is talking or doing something (usually this is done under pressure)

I had to think on my feet when the flood waters began to approach my house.

throw oneself at (someone's) feet

- to behave in a very humble manner

The man threw himself at his friend's feet and asked for forgiveness for the problems that he had caused.

under (someone's) feet

- to annoy or interrupt someone when he or she is working

The children were under their mother's feet while she was cooking dinner.

vote with one's feet

- to express one's dissatisfaction with something by leaving or walking away

The students were voting with their feet when they began to leave the science course.

wait on (someone) hand and foot

- to serve someone in every possible way, to do everything for someone

I always wait on my friend hand and foot when she comes to visit me.

Heel Idioms


Achilles' heel (of someone or something)

- the weak part of a person/place/system/argument which can easily be attacked or criticized

The lack of a new stadium was the Achilles' heel of the government's plans to host the Olympics.

at (someone`s) heels

- close behind someone

The large car was at my heels while I was driving through the park.

bring (someone) to heel

- to make someone obey you or pay attention to you again after he or she has stopped obeying or paying attention to you

The new supervisor quickly brought the employees to heel.

cool one`s heels

- to be forced to wait by someone in power or authority

I was forced to cool my heels in the lobby while I waited for the job interview.

dig in one's heels

- to refuse to change one's mind or one's course of action

The man decided to dig in his heels and would not accept the offer to settle the dispute.

down-at-the-heels

- poorly dressed, looking poor

A man who looked down-at-the-heels came to the small cafe for dinner.

drag one`s heels

- to act slowly or reluctantly

My friend is dragging his heels about whether or not he should accept the new job.

fall head over heels

- to fall down (and maybe roll over)

The little boy fell head over heels when he was running in the park.

fall head over heels in love (with someone)

- to fall deeply in love with someone

The young man fell head over heels in love with the girl in his English class.

hard on (someone's) heels

- to be following someone very closely

The dog was hard on the young boy's heels.

kick up one`s heels

- to have a good time, to celebrate

We kicked up our heels and had a good time at the party.

on (someone`s) heels

- close behind someone, following someone

The dog was on the heels of the small rabbit.
I was right on my friend's heels as we hurried to the stadium.

on the heels of (something)

- soon after something

There was a big rain storm on the heels of the recent wind storm.

set one back on one's heels

- to surprise or shock or overwhelm someone

The announcement on the school's loudspeaker set everybody back on their heels.

take to one's heels

- to run away

The little boys took to their heels when the older boys approached.

turn on one`s heel

- to turn around suddenly

The dog suddenly turned on his heel and ran away.

Knee Idioms


bring (someone or something) to its/their knees

- to have a negative effect on someone or something, to destroy someone or a group of people, to defeat someone or something

The strike by the teachers quickly brought the school district to its knees.

go down on bended knee

- to show a lot of emotion when you are asking someone for something, to act like a servant

The man had to go down on bended knee to ask for the job.

go down on one's knees

- to show a lot of emotion when you are asking someone for something, to act like a servant

I was forced to go down on my knees and ask my supervisor for a holiday.

knee-high to a grasshopper

- not very tall (usually used for a child)

My grandfather told me many stories when I was knee-high to a grasshopper.

on bended knee

- with great humility

I went to my neighbor on bended knee to ask him if I could borrow some money.

Leg Idioms


Break a leg!

- Good luck! (an expression that is used in theater performances)

"Break a leg!" the director called to the lead actor.

cost an arm and a leg or cost (someone) an arm and a leg

- to cost much money

My father's car cost him an arm and a leg.

get one's sea legs

- to become accustomed to something, to become accustomed to a ship moving at sea

After a few days at my new job, I was able to get my sea legs.
After we got our sea legs, we were able to walk around the boat.

have a hollow leg

- to be able to eat or drink a lot

I think that my friend has a hollow leg. He never stops eating.

(not) have a leg to stand on

- to have no support or excuse or evidence for something

The criminal does not have a leg to stand on in his defense.

have a leg up on (someone)

- to have an advantage in your job or education because someone gives you help or money

The boy went to summer school which should give him a leg up on the other students in his class.

have legs

- (an idea or plan or topic) is likely to succeed or to continue

The news story has legs. People will be talking about it for a long time.

on (something's) last legs

- something is almost worn out or finished

My television is on its last legs and I will soon have to buy a new one.

pay an arm and a leg (for something)

- to pay a lot of money for something

The woman paid an arm and a leg for her new coat.

pull (someone`s) leg

- to fool someone, to trick someone, to joke with someone

My friend was pulling my leg when he said that he had won much money.

shake a leg

- to go fast, to hurry

"Please try and shake a leg. We are already late for the concert."

stretch one's legs

- to walk around after sitting or lying down for a period of time

The airplane passenger decided to stand up and stretch her legs.

one's tail is between one`s legs

- one has a feeling of being beaten or humiliated (like a frightened dog as it walks away)

The salesman was forced to leave the company with his tail between his legs after he told a lie about his sales figures.

with one's tail between one's legs

- feeling beaten or humiliated (like a frightened or defeated dog as it walks away)

The saleswoman left the sales meeting with her tail between her legs because she did not meet the sales target.

Toe Idioms


dip one's toe in the water

- to slowly start to do something new in order to see if you like it or if other people will approve of it

I am doing some volunteer work at the hospital in order to dip my toe in the water and see if I like the medical field.

from head to toe

- from the top of one's head to one's feet

I dressed warmly from head to toe before I went outside.

get a toehold (somewhere)

- to find a starting point somewhere, to get a firm basis where further progress or development is possible

Our company was finally able to get a toehold in the textbook market.

go toe-to-toe (with someone)

- to be in close and direct confrontation or competition with someone, to be in close combat with someone

The two men went toe-to-toe in their debate.
The wrestlers went toe-to-toe for the championship.

keep on one's toes

- to stay alert and watchful

The students were forced to keep on their toes by their new teacher.

make one's toes curl

- to make one feel uncomfortable

The story about the horrible accident made my toes curl.
I was right on my friend's heels as we hurried to the stadium.

on one`s toes

- alert, ready to act

The speaker kept the audience members on their toes by asking many interesting questions.

on tiptoe

- standing or walking on the front part of one's feet

I stood on tiptoe in order to look into the construction site.

put one's toe in the water

- to slowly start to do something new to see if you like it or to see if other people will approve of it

I plan to put my toe in the water to see if the new job is suitable for me.

step on (someone`s) toes

- to do something that interferes with or offends someone else

The man is careful that he does not step on anybody's toes at his company.

toe the line/mark

- to follow the rules, to do what one is expected to do

The team members were forced to toe the line when the new coach arrived.

tread on (someone`s) toes

- to do something that interferes with or offends someone else

I do not want to tread on my supervisor's toes because he is not in a good mood today.



Idiom Quizzes - Leg and Foot

    Choose an idiom to replace the expression in the brackets:

  1. The boy wanted to enter the singing contest but he (lost his courage) and did not enter.

    (a) dug in his heels (b) got cold feet (c) dragged his heels (d) kicked up his heels



  2. The city is (acting slowly) in deciding to build a new stadium.

    (a) on tiptoe (b) shaking a leg (c) on bended knee (d) dragging its heels



  3. I (made a bad start) with my neighbor and we are still unable to become friends.

    (a) got off on the wrong foot (b) stretched my legs (c) shot myself in the foot (d) had two left feet



  4. On the last day of exams we (celebrated) by going to a local restaurant.

    (a) voted with our feet (b) got our feet wet (c) kicked up our heels (d) let the grass grow under our feet



  5. My father is (recovering) after he spent a week in bed because of illness.

    (a) back on his feet (b) cooling his heels (c) swept off his feet (d) light on his feet



  6. My stereo is (near the end of its usefulness) after ten years of use.

    (a) bound hand and foot (b) standing on its own two feet (c) on its toes (d) on its last legs



  7. My uncle was (joking around) when he said that he had won a large amount of money.

    (a) footloose and fancy-free (b) pulling my leg (c) getting his feet wet (d) landing on his feet



  8. The boy was taught by his parents to (be independent) when he was very young.

    (a) keep his feet on the ground (b) stand on his own two feet (c) be knee-high to a grasshopper (d) let the grass grow under his feet



  9. The driving instructor keeps his students (alert) by asking them to do many complicated things while driving.

    (a) on their toes (b) on bended knee (c) on tiptoe (d) on foot



  10. The manager finally (took firm action) to stop the abuse of sick time by the employees.

    (a) got his foot in the door (b) kicked up his heels (c) put his foot down (d) landed on his feet



  11. I think that we should (hurry) if we want to get to the movie on time.

    (a) kick up our heels (b) shake a leg (c) get our feet wet (d) drag our feet



    Return to Main Index